Lilium philadelphicum

Lilium philadelphicum

If only we had more space to grow many liliums. Perhaps the garden needs a mezzanine floor.  Such a structure would solve most of our space problems… and grow more liliums.

There are plenty of online resources in relation to the selection and cultivation of species and hybrid liliums. You can also go retro by obtaining relatively cheap books on the subjects. In view of this our general comments will be brief.

Lliliums need a well-drained location with at least half a day of sunshine. If it’s too shady, the stems will stretch and lean towards the sun; trumpet lilies (regales) are the most shade sensitive. Lilies love full sun, as long as the bulbs are deep enough to keep cool when temperatures soar. Good air circulation and spacing of the plants will control disease. If you do see brown spots on the leaves, use any fungicide recommended for roses.

Description and Distribution:
Growing at a height of up to 60cm and is topped by upright, cup-shaped, purple-spotted, red-orange flowers. 1-5 funnel-shaped flowers, mostly red to orange with purplish-brown spots, on an erect stem with whorled leaves. There are usually one to four flowers per plant. The leaves of this perennial are long and narrow and arranged in whorls. The bulbs are formed on short stolens.

Despite its name this lilium is native to the North American Continent. The name Philadelphicum came about when Carl Linnaeus* was sent material by early botanists from the city of Philadelphia (Pennsylvania).

Availability:
From our nursery but very few.

* Swedish Carl Linnaeus (1707-1788), also known as Carl von Linné or Carolus Linnaeus, is often called the Father of Taxonomy. His system for naming, ranking, and classifying organisms is still in wide use today (with many changes). His ideas on classification have influenced generations of biologists during and after his own lifetime, even those opposed to the philosophical and theological roots of his work.

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January 23, 2018